An Analysis of Prospective Class Teachers’ Problem Solving Beliefs and Problem Posing Self-Efficacy Beliefs

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Yasemin Deringöl

Abstract

The present study aims to identify and examine prospective classroom teachers’ beliefs in solving mathematical problems and their self-efficacy beliefs about posing mathematical problems through various different variables. To this end, the study has been conducted with the participation of 171 prospective classroom teachers currently studying at a state university. The following data collection tools have been used in the study: “Personal Information Form”, “Belief Scale for Mathematical Problem Solving” and the “Belief Scale for Problem Posing Self-Efficacy”. The data thus obtained has been analyzed by using Independent Sample t Test, One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Pearson Product Correlation Coefficient technique. As a result of the study, it has been established that the prospective classroom teachers have a moderate level of belief in solving mathematical problems while maintaining a higher level of self-efficacy belief in posing mathematical problems. It has also been established that there is a moderately positive and statistically significant relationship between the prospective classroom teachers’ beliefs in solving mathematical problems and their self-efficacy beliefs posing mathematical problems. The results of this study suggest that the introduction of curricular activities that may help prospective classroom teachers improve their beliefs in solving problems and their self-efficacy beliefs in posing problems during their university years may bring about positive outcomes.

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